English

At KS3, in Year 7 and 8 students develop their skills within English by accessing a range of GCSE standard texts and poetry. For example, Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, A Christmas Carol by Dickens and Jane Eyre by Bronte. The challenge is high and the demands of the curriculum means that there is no wasted time in Key Stage 3.From Year 9, students follow the AQA GCSE English Language syllabus and are expected to read, understand and analyse a wide range of different texts covering the 19th, 20th and 21st century time periods as well as to write clearly, coherently and accurately using a range of vocabulary and sentence structures. There are two examination papers, relating reading sources to the topic and theme of writing tasks. The reading sources act as stimulus for writing tasks, providing students with a clear route through each paper.

 

Paper 1, Explorations in Creative Reading and Writing, looks at how writers use narrative and descriptive techniques to engage the interest of readers.

 

Paper 2, Writers’ Viewpoints and Perspectives, looks at how different writers present a similar topic over time.

 

Students follow the AQA GCSE English Literature syllabus and are expected to read, understand and analyse a wide range of Literature covering Shakespeare, the 19th Century novel, modern texts and poetry. All examinations are closed-book, meaning that all materials for examination are provided in the assessment.

 

Paper 1, Shakespeare,  expects students to answer one question on their play of choice. They will be required to write in detail about an extract from the play and then to write about the play as a whole.

With The 19th-century novel, students will answer one question on their novel of choice. They will be required to write in detail about an extract from the novel and then to write about the novel as a whole.

Paper 2, Section A Modern texts expects students to answer one essay question from a choice of two on their studied modern prose or drama text. Poetry expects that students will answer one comparative question on one named poem printed on the paper and one other poem from their chosen anthology cluster. In Unseen Poetry, students will answer one question on one unseen poem and one question comparing this poem with a second unseen poem.