Respect

Religious Studies

 

KS3

 

Year 7

In Year 7, RS is taught during one lesson a week and looks at the foundations of the six world main religions; Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, Sikhism and Judaism. Pupils study the background to these religions, key features, inspirational leaders, festivals and stories.

 

Year 8

In Year 8 pupils look at moral issues and key questions in life. Pupils begin by analysing how religion can be a force for good/bad, how the world was created, wealth and poverty, animal rights and ideas of good versus evil.

 

KS4

 

Years 9-11

Students start the Edexcel GCSE course for Religious Studies in Year 9 and have two lessons per week. The GCSE will be assessed through two exam papers, Religion and Life and Religion and Society, both now sat at the end of Year 11. Students investigate the following contemporary moral issues from religious and non-religious viewpoints:-

 

Religion and Life: 9/10 Syllabus Content

 

Belief in God

Arguments for and against belief in God, religious upbringing, religious experience, the design argument, the causation argument, scientific and religious explanations of the origins of the world, the problem of evil and suffering and the media and belief in God.

 

Matters of Life and Death

Christian beliefs in life after death and how it affects the way they live, Islamic beliefs about life after death, non-religious belief in life after death, non-belief in life after death, abortion, Christian attitudes to abortion, Muslim attitudes to abortion, euthanasia, Christian attitudes to euthanasia, Muslim attitudes to euthanasia and matters of life and death in the media.

 

Marriage and the Family

Changing attitudes towards marriage, divorce, family and homosexuality in the UK. Christian and Muslim attitudes to sex outside marriage, Christian and Muslim attitudes to divorce, Christian and Muslim teachings on family life, Christian and Muslim attitudes to homosexuality, Christian and Muslim attitudes to contraception.

 

Religion and Community Cohesion

Changing attitudes to gender roles in the UK, Christian and Muslim attitudes to equal rights for women, the UK as a multi-ethnic society, Government action to promote community cohesion, why Christians and Muslims should promote racial harmony, the UK as a multi-faith society, issues raised about multi-faith societies, ways in which religions work to promote community cohesion, issues of religion and community cohesion in the media.

 

Religion and Society: YEAR 10/11 Syllabus Content

 

Rights and Responsibilities

Christians and the Bible, Christians and the authority of the Church, Christians and conscience, Christians and situation ethics, Christians and moral authorities, Human Rights in the UK, why Human Rights are important to Christians, democratic and electoral processes, Christian teachings on moral duties and responsibilities, the nature of genetic engineering, Christian attitudes to genetic engineering.

 

Environmental and Medical Issues

Global warming, pollution, natural resources, Christian and Muslim teachings on stewardship and the environment, medical treatment for infertility, Christian and Muslim attitudes to medical treatment for infertility, transplant surgery, Christian and Muslim attitudes to transplant surgery.

 

Peace and Conflict

Causes of war, the UN and world peace, religious organisations and peace, just war theory, Christian and Muslim attitudes to war, Christian and Muslim attitudes to bullying, Christian and Muslim teachings on forgiveness and reconciliation.

 

Crime and Punishment

The need for law and justice, theories of punishment, Christians and justice, Muslims and justice, non-religious arguments about capital punishment, Christian and Muslim attitudes to capital punishment, drugs and alcohol laws, social and health problems caused by drugs and alcohol, Christian and Muslim attitudes to drugs and alcohol.

 

 

PSHE Overview

 

PSHE education at Denton Community College is a programme of learning through which children and young people acquire the knowledge, understanding and skills they need to manage their lives now and in the future.

 

As part of a whole-school approach, our PSHE education develops the qualities and attributes pupils need to thrive as individuals, family members and members of society.

 

Denton Community College is currently using the framework laid out by the PSHE Association (2013) in the absence of a national framework produced by the government.

 

At Denton Community College we have tried to combine a whole school approach to PSHE by incorporating important PSHE themes into our ‘Themes of the Week assembly programmes’ and pastoral time.

 

Denton Community College also provides two lessons a week of an RE/PSHE themed curriculum covering important topics such as ‘sex and relationship’ education and careers.

 

Other subject areas also provide an opportunity for learning in areas such as sport (physical and mental well-being), Food Technology (healthy lifestyles) and ICT (cyber-bullying/internet safety) to name a few examples.

 

PSHE education can help to reduce or remove many of the barriers to learning experienced by pupils, significantly improving their capacity to learn and achieve. The PSHE education programme at Denton Community College makes a significant contribution to pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural (SMSC) development, their behaviour and safety and the school’s statutory responsibility to promote pupils’ wellbeing.

 

PSHE education at Denton Community College equips our pupils with the knowledge, understanding, skills and strategies required to live healthy, safe, productive, capable, responsible and balanced lives. It encourages them to be enterprising and supports them in making effective transitions, positive learning and career choices and in achieving economic wellbeing. A critical component of our PSHE education is providing opportunities for children and young people to reflect on and clarify their own values and attitudes and explore the complex and sometimes conflicting range of values and attitudes they encounter now and in the future.

 

Our PSHE curriculum contributes to personal development by helping pupils to build their confidence, resilience and self-esteem, and to identify and manage risk, make informed choices and understand what influences their decisions. It enables them to recognise, accept and shape their identities, to understand and accommodate difference and change, to manage emotions and to communicate constructively in a variety of settings. Developing an understanding of themselves, empathy and the ability to work with others will help pupils to form and maintain good relationships, develop the essential skills for future employability and better enjoy and manage their lives.

 

Aims

 

The overarching aim for PSHE education is to provide pupils with:

accurate and relevant knowledge

 

opportunities to turn that knowledge into personal understanding

 

opportunities to explore, clarify and if necessary challenge, their own and others’ values, attitudes, beliefs, rights and responsibilities
the skills and strategies they need in order to live healthy, safe, fulfilling, responsible and balanced lives.

 

Overarching Concepts

 

Identity (their personal qualities, attitudes, skills, attributes and achievements and what influences these)

 

Relationships (including different types and in different settings)
A healthy (including physically, emotionally and socially) balanced lifestyle (including within relationships, work-life, exercise and rest, spending and saving and diet)

 

Risk (to be managed rather than simply avoided) and safety (including behaviour and strategies in different settings)

 

Diversity and equality (in all its forms)

 

Rights, responsibilities (including fairness and justice) and consent (in different contexts)

 

Change (as something to be managed) and resilience (the skills, strategies and ‘inner resources’ we can draw on when faced with
challenging change or circumstance)

 

Power (how it is used and encountered in a variety of contexts including persuasion, bullying, negotiation and ‘win-win’ outcomes)

 

Career (including enterprise and economic understanding).

 

PSHE education makes a significant contribution to the development of a wide range of essential skills.

 

The intrapersonal skills required for self-management 

- Critical, constructive self-reflection (including being aware of own needs, motivations and learning, strengths and next steps for development, how we are influenced by our perception of peers’ behaviour)

 

- Learning from experience to seek out and make use of constructive feedback

 

- Setting challenging personal goals (including developing strategies to achieve them and knowing when to change them)

 

- Making decisions (knowing when to be flexible)

 

- Recognising some of the common ways our brains can ‘trick us’ or ‘trap us’ in unhelpful thinking (including generalisation, distortion of events, deletion of information, misconceptions or misperceptions about the behaviour of peers)

 

- Resilience, self-motivation, adaptability, constructively managing change including setbacks and stress)

 

- Self-regulation.

 

The interpersonal skills required for positive relationships in a wide variety of settings 

- Active listening

 

- Empathy

 

- Communication (non-verbal and verbal including assertiveness and recognising how this differs from aggressive and passive behaviour; being able to present and communicate ideas, arguments and thoughts effectively)

 

- Team working (including agreeing clear and challenging outcomes, facilitation, cooperation, networking and the ability to provide, receive and respond to, constructive feedback and take on different roles; the ability to recognise and learn from others experience)

 

- Negotiation (including flexibility, self-advocacy and compromise)

 

- Recognising and utilising strategies for managing pressure, persuasion and coercion

 

- Responding to the need for positive affirmation for self and others.

 

The skills of enquiry

 

- Gathering and using data (including assessing the validity and reliability of sources of data and using a variety of sources)

 

- Analysis (including separating fact from opinion)

 

- Planning and deciding

 

- Recalling and applying knowledge creatively and in novel situations

 

- Drawing and defending conclusions using evidence and not just assertion Identification, assessment (including prediction) and management of risk.

 

- Evaluating social norms

 

- Reviewing progress against objectives

 

Core Theme 1 – Health and Wellbeing

Key Stage 3

 

Area covered Students will:

Curriculum link

Recognise their personal strengths and how this affects their self confidence and self-esteem

Cross-curricular

Recognise that the way in which personal qualities, attitudes, skills and achievements are evaluated by others, affects confidence and self-esteem

Cross-curricular

Be able to accept helpful feedback or reject unhelpful criticism

Cross-curricular

Know the importance of taking increased responsibility for their own personal hygiene

Pastoral

Understand the purpose and importance of immunisation and vaccination

Pastoral

Know that certain infections can be spread through sexual activity and that barrier contraceptives offer some protection against certain STIs

RE/PSHE Curriculum

Know about contraception, including the condom and pill (see also Relationships)

RE/PSHE Curriculum

Understand the benefits of physical activity and exercise and the importance of sleep

PE Curriculum

Recognise and manage what influences their choices about exercise

PE Curriculum

Know what constitutes a balanced diet and its benefits (including the risks associated with both obesity and dieting)

PE Curriculum/Food Technology

Be aware of what might influence their decisions about eating a balanced diet

PE/Food Technology curriculum

Be objective about how the media portrays young people, body image and health issues and know that identity is affected by a range of factors, including the media and a positive sense of self

Year 7 English Curriculum

Know ways of recognising and reducing risk, minimising harm and getting help in emergency and risky situations. To understand risk within the context of personal safety, especially accident prevention and road safety.

Assemblies and outside agencies such as the Fire Brigade talks on fireworks and Police talks about summer safety.

Understand the positive and negative roles played by drugs in society (including alcohol) factual information about legal and illegal substances, including alcohol, volatile substances, tobacco and cannabis and the law relating to their supply, use and misuse.

Drug and Alcohol awareness session with outside agency

Recognise and manage different influences on their decisions about the use of substances, (including clarifying and challenging their own perceptions values and beliefs) including managing peer influence

Drug and Alcohol awareness session with outside agency

Understand and manage the personal and social risks and consequences for themselves and others of making different decisions regarding substances, including the benefits of not drinking alcohol (or delaying the age at which to start) and the benefits of not smoking including not harming others with second-hand smoke

Drug and Alcohol awareness session with outside agency

 

 

Key Stage 4

 

Area covered Students will:

Curriculum link

Evaluate the extent to which their self-confidence and self-esteem are affected by the judgments of others

Cross-curricular

Make effective use of constructive feedback and differentiating between helpful feedback and unhelpful criticism

Cross- curricular

Know where and how to obtain health information, advice and support (including sexual health services)

RE/PSHE Curriculum

Know about STIs, including HIV/AIDS, how to protect themselves and others from infection and how to respond if they feel they or others are at risk

RE/PSHE Curriculum

Know how to recognise and follow health and safety procedures

Assemblies and outside agencies such as the Fire Brigade talks on fireworks and Police talks about summer safety/ cross-curricular (especially in specialisms)

Know about personal safety and protection, reducing risk and minimising harm in different settings (including social settings, the street, on roads and during travel)

Assemblies and outside agencies such as the Fire Brigade talks on fireworks and Police talks about summer safety.

Understand the short and long-term consequences of substance use and misuse for the health and mental and emotional wellbeing of individuals, families and communities, including the health risks related to second-hand smoke

RE/PSHE Curriculum

Understand the terms ‘habit’, ‘dependence’ and ‘addiction’ in relation to substance use and to whom to talk if they have concerns

RE/PSHE Curriculum

Know and understand the wider risks and consequences of legal and illegal substance use including on their personal safety, career, relationships and future lifestyle

RE/PSHE Curriculum

 

Core Theme 2 – Relationships

Key Stage 3

 

Area covered Students will:

Curriculum link

Develop the skills and knowledge required to manage the transition to, and the expectations of, secondary education

Pastoral and cross-curricular

Recognise, clarify and if necessary challenge their own core values and how their values influence their choices

Pastoral and cross-curricular

Understand and develop the qualities and behaviours they should expect and exhibit in a wide variety of positive relationships (including teams, class, friendships etc.)

Pastoral and cross-curricular

Further develop and rehearse the skills of team working including objective setting, outcome planning, cooperation, negotiation, managing setback and compromise

Cross- curricular and extra -curricular

Further develop the communication skills of active listening, negotiation, offering and receiving constructive feedback and assertiveness

Cross-curricular and extra-curricular

Explore the range of positive qualities people bring to relationships

RE/PSHE Curriculum

Know that relationships can cause strong feelings and emotions (including sexual attraction)

RE/PSHE Curriculum

Understand and mirror the features of positive and stable relationships (including trust, mutual respect, honesty) and be able to identify and reject the features of unhealthy relationships

RE/PSHE Curriculum

Understand and respect/value different types of relationships, including those within families, friendships, romantic or intimate relationships and the factors that can affect these (including age, gender, power and interests)

RE/PSHE Curriculum

Understand the nature and importance of marriage, civil partnerships and other stable, long-term relationships for family life and bringing up children

RE/PSHE Curriculum

Know how to deal with a breakdown in a relationship and the effects of change, including loss, separation, divorce and bereavement

RE/PSHE Curriculum

Understand the importance of friendship and to begin to consider love and sexual relationships in this context

RE/PSHE Curriculum

Acknowledge the right not to have intimate relationships until ready

RE/PSHE Curriculum

Understand what expectations might be of having a girl/boyfriend

RE/PSHE Curriculum

Understand that consent is freely given and that being pressurised, persuaded or coerced to agree to something is not ‘consent’. To recognise when others are using inappropriate persuasion, and coercion and how to respond

RE/PSHE Curriculum

Understand about readiness for sex and the benefits of delaying sex (or any level of intimacy beyond that with which the individual feels comfortable)

RE/PSHE Curriculum and Tameside Council

Know about contraception, including the condom and pill (see also ‘Health’) and the importance of communication and negotiation in condom use

RE/PSHE Curriculum and Tameside Council

Know about the emotional aspects of relationships

RE/PSHE Curriculum

Know about the choices and risks related to unprotected sex, which could include exploring the options available in the event of unintended pregnancy and sources of accurate, impartial advice

RE/PSHE Curriculum and Tameside Council

Recognise the portrayal and impact of sex in the media and social media (which might include music videos, advertising, ‘sexting’)

RE/PSHE Curriculum

Know about and practice the safe and responsible use of information communication technology (including safe management of own and others’ personal data including images)

Assemblies/theme of the week/ICT lessons

Recognise peer pressure and have strategies to manage both

RE/PSHE Lessons

Recognise bullying and abuse in all its forms (including prejudice based bullying both in school and online, exploitation, trafficking, female genital mutilation and forced marriage) and to have the skills and strategies to manage being targeted or witnessing others being targeted

RE/PSHE lessons, assemblies, pastoral

 

 

Key Stage 4

 

Area covered

Curriculum link

Know/respect and mirror the characteristics and benefits of positive, strong, supportive, equal relationships

RE/PSHE Curriculum

Recognise when a relationship is unhealthy or abusive (including the unacceptability of both emotional and physical abuse or violence

RE/PSHE Curriculum

Manage changes in personal relationships including the ending of relationships

RE/PSHE Curriculum

Develop an awareness of exploitation, bullying and harassment in relationships (including the unique challenges posed by online bullying and the unacceptability of physical, emotional, sexual abuse in all types of teenage relationships, including in group settings such as gangs) and how to respond

RE/PSHE Curriculum, themes of the week, assemblies, pastoral

Know about impact of domestic abuse (including sources of help and support)

RE/PSHE Curriculum

Understand the impact of separation, divorce and bereavement on families and the need to adapt to changing circumstances

RE/PSHE Curriculum

Know about statutory and voluntary organisations that support relationships experiencing difficulties or in crisis, such as relationship breakdown, separation, divorce, or bereavement

RE/PSHE Curriculum

Know about and respect diversity in sexual attraction and developing sexuality, including sources of support and reassurance and how to access them

RE/PSHE Curriculum and Diversity Awareness Day

Recognise the impact of drugs and alcohol on choices and sexual behaviour

RE/PSHE Curriculum

Understand and respect others’ faith and cultural expectations concerning relationships and sexual activity

RE/PSHE Curriculum

Assess readiness for sex in a measured and appropriate way

RE/PSHE Curriculum and Tameside Council

Know about accessing and the correct use of contraception, negotiating condom use, reinforcing and building on learning in Key Stage 3

RE/PSHE Curriculum and Tameside Council

Understand the consequences of unintended pregnancy and of teenage parenthood (in the context of learning about parenting skills and qualities and their importance to family life)

RE/PSHE Curriculum and Tameside Council

Know about abortion, including the current legal position and the range of beliefs, opinions and myths about it

RE/PSHE Curriculum

Know the pathways available in the event of unintended pregnancy, the possible physical and emotional reactions and responses people may have to each option and who to talk to for accurate, impartial advice and support

RE/PSHE Curriculum and Tameside Council

Know that fertility decreases with age

RE/PSHE Curriculum

 

 

Core theme 3 – Living in the Wider World – Economic well-being, careers and the world of work

Key Stage 3

 

Area covered Students will:

Curriculum link

Develop the knowledge and skills needed for setting realistic and challenging personal targets and goals (including the transition to Key Stage 3)

Cross-curricular/pastoral

Respect the similarities, differences and diversity among people of different race, culture, ability, disability, sex, gender identity, age and sexual orientation and the impact of stereotyping, prejudice, bullying, discrimination on individuals and communities

RE/PSHE Curriculum

Know about discrimination, how to respond when being discriminated against and understand their responsibilities towards others who are experiencing discrimination

RE/PSHE Curriculum

Recognise that they have the same rights to opportunities in learning and work as other people and to recognize and challenge stereotypes

Pastoral, cross-curricular

Identify own strengths, interests, skills and qualities as part of the personal review and planning process, including their value to future employability

Pastoral, cross-curricular

Know about different work roles and career pathways, including clarifying their own early aspirations

RE/PSHE Curriculum

Be informed about the choices available to them at the end of Key Stage 3, sources of information, advice and support, and the skills to manage this decision-making process

RE/PSHE Curriculum

Explore social and moral dilemmas about the use of money, (including how the choices pupils make as consumers affect other people’s economies and environments)

RE/PSHE Curriculum, CAP debt counselling sessions

 

 

Key Stage 4

 

Area covered

Curriculum link

Evaluate their own personal strengths and areas for development and to use this to inform goal setting

Pastoral, cross-curricular

Know about the unacceptability of all forms of discrimination, and the need to challenge it in the wider community including the workplace

Pastoral, cross-curricular, RE/PSHE Curriculum

Be able to think critically about extremism and intolerance in whatever forms they take

Pastoral, cross-curricular, RE/PSHE Curriculum

Know about the information, advice and guidance available to them and how to access it

Pastoral, cross-curricular

Further develop study and employability skills (including time management, self-organisation and presentation, project planning, team working)

Pastoral, cross-curricular, RE/PSHE Curriculum

Know about the range of opportunities available to them for career progression, including in education, training and employment

Pastoral and RE/PSHE Curriculum